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Ship repair in Northern Europe in the spotlight

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The SS Nomadic back at H&W, A&P setting records, a Pole Star at Rosyth, a strong 2020 for Cammell Laird, a midlife upgrade at Damen, and busy Remontowa and SMS

The SS Nomadic, the ship which took passengers to RMS Titanic from Cherbourg Harbour, is undergoing restoration works this month which will be carried out by its original builders, Harland & Wolff. Titanic Foundation, the charity set up to preserve and promote Belfast’s maritime and industrial heritage including the development of Titanic Belfast, owns the tender to RMS Titanic and  appointed Harland & Wolff to carry out the works on the ship that they completed in 1911.

The SS Nomadic is now included in the Titanic Belfast Experience, giving visitors the chance to step onboard the world’s biggest RMS Titanic artefact. A quarter of the size of the iconic passenger liner, the Nomadic has many of the same ornate features and finishes and was completed in 1911.

As the last remaining White Star Line ship, SS Nomadic requires continuous maintenance and restoration. The works taking place in October will see repairs to the keel blocks supporting the ship, which is located in the Hamilton Dry Dock. Harland & Wolff also carried out restoration works on the ship in 2011 after it returned to Belfast, reinstating the bridge deck, flying bridge desk and the funnel.

“The SS Nomadic is such an authentic part of Belfast’s maritime history and a fantastic feature on the Maritime Mile, said Kerrie Sweeney, Chief Executive of Titanic Foundation. “To have Harland & Wolff return to carry out work on the ship they once built is a really significant moment in the history of the ship.”

Perry Kennedy, Interim Managing Director of Harland & Wolff commented; “We’re very excited to begin work on this iconic ship once more. As the original builders, this is a great opportunity to continue our proud heritage alongside the Titanic Foundation.”

 

Read more in the latest issue of DryDock

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